Lies, Damned Lies & Statistics

How many times have you read on consultants and others websites how much business they have won for their clients, or what percentage of projects their clients win as a result of their involvement? Boring and far-fetched isn’t it!

We understand that you win the business not us – we only help you. The client buys your team through the relationships, trust and rapport which they build up during the interview / presentation stage of the process.

So we chose to measure ourselves not by some meaningless statistics, but rather instead to offer you the REAL, MEANINGFUL and TANGIBLE guarantee that…….

“If you don’t perceive that we have added real the value then we waive the fee”

In other words if your team doesn’t do significantly better as a result of our involvement than they would have expected to by preparing on their own then you don’t pay us. We want you to see our involvement with your team as excellent value for money so we go the extra mile to make sure that they are as well prepared and briefed as possible (time allowing)!

For more information or to discuss a specific interview or presentation that you have coming up please contact us via: http://www.thebidcoach.co.uk/ or email win@thebidcoach.com or ring our office Tel: 01963 240555

The Bid Coach are experts in training your teams to win.

P.S. Just for the record we have never had to fulfil this promise!

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Tell me “whats in it for me?”

Set the theme for your presentation as the first thing you do. It will focus you and the audience, they are more likely to receive your message – very simple really!

The theme is the overarching message that you want to deliver, it is the point you are there presenting. All successful presentations have well-developed themes.

The theme informs the content – the stories, evidences and proofs that are the body of the presentation.

When presenting state the theme to your audience early, and repeat it several times throughout, to make sure they get it and remember it.  Make the theme simple, straightforward and relevant to the audience. If you don’t do this you make it hard work for the audience to work out what your presentation is all about, and this is very likely to turn them off and then they don’t watch or listen, or they may reach the wrong conclusions.

State the theme at the end of the presentation too, phrased in such a way that they know you are at the end of the presentation.

Contact us on 01963 240555 or win@thebidcaoch.com

Top Ten Tips – Preparation for a Presentation

ImageWhen preparing for a presentation there are some golden rules that you can follow to make your presentation more interesting, therefore more memorable and thus make you seem all the more professional to your audience.

Presenting business topics can be potentially difficult to make interesting, but follow the tips below and you give yourself every opportunity to get and hold your audience’s attention, so they retain your messages and enjoy your presentation all the more

  1. Begin with something thought-provoking. Offer up a surprising insight into the subject, or adopt a new position on the subject just to make the audience think.
  2. Minimise your intro. They don’t need or want to know everything about you, or your firm, or why you are the speaker – this will just bore them. Have an introduction which is one or two sentences long at most.
  3. Short and sweet. Remember how many presentations you’ve had to endure that just went on and on, well make sure you don’t fall into the same trap – make it half as long as you originally thought it should be.
  4. Facts are friendly. Avoid generalities as they suggest your thinking is also “fluffy”. Make your case a mixture of factual evidences and proofs that show your ability. Stories that highlight your experience in specific circumstances can be memorable and dramatic.
  5. Be relevant. Your audience will only pay attention to stories, ideas and facts which are immediately relevant.
  6. Use straightforward backgrounds. When you use slides or other visual aides keep them simple so they don’t distract or confuse the audience.
  7. Use large, easy to read fonts. Make it easy for the audience to read the slides, to understand the messages. Avoid bold, italics and ALL-CAPS
  8. Keep graphics simple. Overcomplicated graphics, drawings or tables turn people off. Keep them simple and highlight the specific areas you want the audience to focus on.
  9. Less is more. You want the audience to remember your message so stick to the really key messages which you want them to take in. Repeat these several times to increase their retention levels.
  10. Build your story. Presentations can be boring when they only contain facts with little or no context. Setting them within a story provides this and makes the facts more memorable.

Contact us today on 01963 240555 or win@thebidcoach.com

Poor workmen blame their tools!

Visual aides are there to support you, the presenter, not something to hide behind, so make sure that yours do just that!

PowerPoint is the most commonly used tool, and whilst it gets a lot of bad press “death by PowerPoint” this says more about the how presenters use it not the tool itself.

There are many things that you can do to make PowerPoint work for you, some of the more obvious ones are:

Don’t use bullets – they are dull. If you do use them do NOT read them out – this is an insult to the audience – they don’t need you if they can just read everything from the screen!

Keep slides plain – backgrounds that are too fussy will distract the audience. If you want to use a coloured background, chose pastel colours, something that compliments the subject – if you are talking finance don’t go with bright pink for example.

Contrast background – to the text and make sure that both are suitable for the lighting in the room where the presentation is to be delivered.

Use clear fonts – make them large enough to be read – from the back of the auditorium

Slide transitions – Keep these simple. Do not use animation to “fly in” or the like, have the text / visuals come up either all at the same time, or on your click – whichever suits best

Minimum number of slides – Too many slides and the audience will be focused on them and not you. Only use slides to add extra value to what you are saying, they support you, not the other way round.

Do not keep turning around to look at the slides – the audience does not want to see the back of your head. If you want to know what’s on the screen place a pc in front of you – whatever you see there is what the audience can see. You can half turn to point to something on the slide, but do so as infrequently as possible and always face the front when speaking

The Bid Coach are experts in training your teams to win.

Contact Hugh at: via www.thebidcoach.com or win@thebidcoach.com

or ring (01963) 240555

It’s the way you tell-em!

People will remember more about how you said something than the actual words that you spoke so it is crucial that your delivery is the best it can be. Once again there are techniques that you can use to increase the focus of the audience and thus increase how much of what you say they remember.

By this stage if you’ve done everything above you should be quietly confident that you know what you’re going to be talking about which gives you confidence and so you can relax and enjoy the experience. I accept that “enjoy” may not be the first thought in your mind, but if you can convince yourself that you might enjoy the experience then the likelihood is that you will.

The brain sees things like this as a self-fulfilling prophecy, and whatever you think will be the outcome is more than likely how it will turn out – so tell yourself you ARE going to enjoy it as you’ve worked very hard to prepare thoroughly.

Remember, you are going to tell them something that it is in their interest to hear, and that they will benefit from your presentation.

The audience wants you to succeed, for them there is nothing worse than listening to a presenter die on their feet – it’s embarrassing. They would rather you succeed; it makes their life so much easier!

The single most important thing to be is enthusiastic – how can you expect to carry an audience with you if you are not displaying energy and passion for the subject. This doesn’t mean you have to try to become something you’re not, because the audience will see you as phoney if you do. It means taking your natural style, and adding authority and presence through your tone and manner (body language).

The trick is to engage with the audience early – in the first 60 seconds preferably – get them on your side and keep them there. This is where your pithy (what’s in it for you statement / comment / challenge) comes in. It must be something that captures their imagination, is credible and offers them hope.

Another part of engaging with them is to remove barriers – get out from behind the lectern or desk. This means you can move around more, which in turn means you can have more eye contact, use body language to greatest effect and make it easier for the audience to focus on you. Your slides or props are just that – there to support you, not the other way around.

When speaking to a massed audience it is very important to use you voice carefully. You need to make sure that your voice can be heard at the back of the auditorium (sound gets muffled when a room is full of people).

Equally you need to talk more slowly than you would in everyday speech. This is to allow people time to absorb and think about what you have said.

Use pauses often. They allow people to absorb what you’ve said. Pause after saying anything especially important – this not only allows the audience time to absorb and consider what you’ve said but the pause itself tells them that what you just said is something they should pay particular attention to – and they will – if you give them the opportunity. Whilst paused make strong eye contact with as many people as possible – let them acknowledge your eye contact, then move on to more of the audience – this is very powerful!

As this is the single most important section of the preparation and the amount of time you invest here will be re-paid ten-fold. You need to rehearse the presentation from end to end at least 4-6 times, more if you can! Why, well, once you have done it this many times you will know the material so well that you will be less reliant on your notes and need to think less about what you say and more about how you say it.

Make the rehearsal as realistic as possible – deliver the presentation in front of friends or family or look at yourself in a mirror(yes it will feel embarrassing, but you can iron out what sounds good and what doesn’t and change phrases that don’t sound quite right). You will also see those idiosyncrasies that you have – hands in pocket, going “um” a lot, shuffling or pacing and you can then work on reducing them – I didn’t say getting rid of them altogether, just get them under control.

Once you’ve done the presentation in front of friend, family or a mirror doing it in front of a live audience is relatively straightforward – honestly!

In Conclusion

We can all present well if we make sure we follow a few basic principles.

  1. Be clear what it is you want the audience to do as a result of listening to you. Make sure you tell them what your purpose is early on.
  2. Provide appropriate detail, in the form of evidences and proofs, to convince them that this course of action is to their advantage.
  3. Engage with the audience. Make a personal connection with them, no matter how numerous they are.

Most important of all is to rehearse the presentation sufficiently so that you know the material so well you can concentrate on how you engage the audience, and are not just thinking about what you have to say. How many rehearsals this is depends on you, but the acknowledged industry thinking is that this will be between 5-8 times for the first time you present the material and 3-5 thereafter.

The Bid Coach are experts in training your teams to win.

Contact Hugh at: via www.thebidcoach.com or win@thebidcoach.com

or ring (01963) 240555

Less is More!

When you have a framework (or structure) for the key messages you want to communicate and having checked that the story flows logically (otherwise re-order it so it does) you can then start to flesh out each section.

Add detail for each section and think about what you need to bring this to life (evidences and proofs). These are what you use to substantiate (prove) your argument. Lists of tables or numbers are not very good ways of showing these, but strong visual representations are. Do you have these already, if not who does and can you get them?  Always check if using material from a colleague that they know how you are going to use their material and double-check that they are correct.

Having fleshed out the structure with your content read it out loud to yourself,, to check that the logic still holds and the arguments don’t contradict one another. At this stage it is common to have to re-order key points or re-word them in order that they flow better together. Having done this you should also have an idea as  to how long the presentation will take to deliver, and thus how much material you need to take out. [This is the case in 90% of the clients we work with!]

Avoid too much detail for several reasons. Firstly, it may trip you up when you are presenting. Secondly, the audience probably won’t be able to either absorb all the detail or remember it. Thirdly, it distracts from the core messages that you absolutely want them to remember. LESS IS MORE is the golden rule!

The Bid Coach are experts in training your teams to win.

Contact Hugh at: via www.thebidcoach.com or win@thebidcoach.com

or ring (01963) 240555

Build on solid foundations

Start by knowing what it is that you want the audience to do as a result of your presentation. Once you have this you can then start to frame this – I call this the structure of your presentation.

Now you can plan the “story” you want to tell, bearing in mind who your audience are and what action / changes you want them.

Always have an introduction, a main body and a conclusion.

To be effective communication needs to have some repetition – so that the audience has more than one opportunity to hear your message. (Work on the basis of tell em what you’re going to tell em, tell em, and then tell em what you’ve told em).

The Introduction

In the introduction tell them why it’s in their interest to listen and act on the presentation (these are benefits – the what’s in it for them). Be concise here and grab their attention – some significant statistic or fact to grab their attention is good. Equally something that challenges what they think they know should also get their attention!

Also in the introduction let them know how long your presentation will last for, so they can scope this in their mind. There is nothing worse than not knowing how long something is going to last for – at the very least it’s very distracting – and you telling them is also a sign of professionalism  in that you know. This in itself gives you some credibility straight away.

Don’t tell them your life and career history – quite frankly they don’t care about you – it’s the what’s in it for them that they want to know. If you want to give them some info on yourself have the person who introduces you give 30-45 seconds absolute max. on your credentials / expertise / experience – but nothing else.

Main Body

At the start of each main section of the presentation tell them what you’re going to cover – keep this to very short bullets, or visuals that represent them is even better. Then deal with each section in a factual manner – avoid giving them lots of detail (unless this is absolutely fundamental to the argument) as they will forget most of this anyway.

Summary / conclusion

When you get to the end tell them by saying something obvious like “in conclusion, or to summarize” then give them 1,2 or 3 – absolutely no more of the strongest arguments you’ve used during the body of the presentation and leave them with these. It is these that they will remember.

You can refer back to where you started, by saying that I said I was going to tell you x, y, z well that’s what I’ve done (it should be blindingly obvious).

The Bid Coach are experts in training your teams to win.

Contact Hugh at: via www.thebidcoach.com or win@thebidcoach.com

or ring (01963) 240555

Be Prepared!

Make sure your presentation is delivered as you intend, there are a few things that you should do, to make sure you have covered all eventualities.

The 48 hours before the event

  • Confirm with the client that no arrangements have changed
  •  Double-check the address of the venue, and any access restrictions
  • Confirm the dress code to all attending – better to be too formal than too informal.
  • Assign specific tasks to people and divide the presentation materials across the team. (No one person should have the one piece without which you cannot go ahead)
  • Take your own – paper, pens, pointers, easels, screen, extension leads
  • Check whether it’s OK to stick / pin anything to the walls – then make sure you use the correct means (pins, blu-tac, magnetic pads)
  • Be aware of anything happening in the area which might affect travel, such as large crowd events
  • Have contact details for all members of the team who are coming separately so you can check their progress if they are late for a rendezvous
  • Plan to rendezvous the team together at or close to the venue

On the day

  • Be familiar with, the surroundings (room layout, lighting, seating, shape of room etc.)
  • Learn how to control the atmosphere (lights, temperature etc.)
  • Lay the room out as suits the type of presentation (not always possible)
  • Always stand to the left of the screen – as seen by the audience
  • Ensure that you can be seen and heard by all in the room
  • Have your notes well prepared
  • Ensure compatibility with equipment (best way is to take your own)
  • Pour a glass of water
  • Rehearse your first few words to yourself
  • Take a deep breath, and hold it for a couple of seconds
  • Take a sip of water
  • Smile at the audience
  • Make eye contact with as many of the audience as is practical
  • Speak with passion and commitment
  • Remove all equipment and props. Have an inventory list and check that you take everything

Magnificent Seven Presentation Tips

The key to engaging, and thus persuading, your audience is authenticity. This means bringing your true self to the fore. If you try to be something you are not your audience will see straight through you

There are seven key areas you can use when trying to make sure you present as your real self. Look at each briefly in turn and evaluate what effect they can have – for better or for worse!

1) Voice. Use the voice you were given, it’s the one with the most credibility. Don’t try to be someone you’re not – don’t try to put on the voice of another, or to mimic a style you think the audience expects.

2) Content. People know when you’re saying things you really don’t believe, or saying things in a way that is contrary to who you are. If you have to say something that makes you uncomfortable, find a way to re-frame it in terms you can assert with confidence and integrity.

3) Facial expression. Be genuine and be sincere. Forced smiles and other forms of feigned sincerity and enthusiasm are easily detected by the audience. They’re a form of dishonesty and throw into question everything you’re saying.

4) Attire. Dress in clothes of a style that are what you normally wear. If you normally wear a suit and tie then not wearing one to present in is going to make you feel as though you’re in a straight jacket. Equally dressing down from a suit to a polo shirt and chino’s can have the same effect on you. Dress as who you are, and what you feel comfortable in. For formal presentations It’s always better to be one point over than one point under what the audience is wearing.

5) Body language. Don’t try to gesticulate in a style that is much different to your natural style. No gesticulation and exaggerated gesticulation are extremes to be avoided. Work on using some gesticulations, but make sure you feel comfortable in doing them, and make sure they are appropriate for the audience and the subject.

6) Eye contact. When you look at others do you communicate connection and warmth or is it dodgy hit and run style? Make eye contact that is direct and prolonged enough to say, I see you and I’m paying attention to you.

7) Passion. You are more impactful when you’re passionate about your subject, but you don’t have to effuse to show passion. It can be contained in the quality of our content, the cool confidence of our delivery, or the simmering facial expressions.

The bottom line is: Be yourself. Everyone else is taken!

Call us now on 01963 240555 or email win@thebidcoach.com